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Crosby Street Synagogue

1834

Crosby Street Synagogue Exterior

Crosby Street Synagogue Exterior

At the population of the city, including the Jews, was moving uptown, the location on Mill Street (now South William Street) in Lower Manhattan became increasingly inconvenient.  In 1834 the congregation built a new synagogue on Crosby Street (street numbers 56 to 62), between Broom and Spring Street.  It was fifty-three feet wide and seventy five feet long, substantially larger that the previous two buildings.  The conerstone for this building was the same one that had been used in the first Mill Street synagogue - a vivid symbol of the continuity of generations and traditions within the congregation.  The synagogue was built with a basement, ten feet high, which was used for housing a chapel, the congregational school, and meeting rooms.

 

The Crosby Street synagogue was described in the New York Times as a "remarkably neat building."  The Boston Courier reported that it had been "constructed in admirable taste."

The 'Pineapple' Rimonim

These bells adorned a Torah scroll at the consecration ceremony of the First Mill Street Synagogue in 1730.

1730
Hanukkiah

Synagogue tradition associates this Hanukkah lamp with the First Mill Street Synagogue of 1730.

1730